Building Foundations Sampler QAL – Block 20

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This week’s quilt-along block, Block #20, is Winged Arrow, from a syndicated mail-order column written by Florence LaGanke Harris; printed in many periodicals in the late 1920s – 1940s.

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CUTTING:

From background, (pale blue and green in photo above) cut 8 — 3 5/8″ squares (cut in half diagonally to make 16 A triangles).

From accent fabric #1 (orange in photo above) cut 1 — 5 3/4″ square (cut in half diagonally twice to make 4 B triangles).

From accent fabric #2 (red-orange in photo above) cut 1 — 5 3/4″ square (cut in half diagonally twice to make 4 B triangles).

 

ASSEMBLY:

1. Join one background A triangle and one accent fabric #1 B triangle as shown below. Press seam allowance toward print fabric. Make four.

WingedArrowGeese1

2. Join a second background A triangle to the opposite side to complete flying geese units:

WingedArrowGeese2

3. Trim each flying geese unit to 3″ x 5″:WingedArrowGeese3

4. Repeat steps 1-3 using accent fabric #2 B triangles.

5. Join an accent fabric #1 flying geese to the bottom edge of an accent fabric #2 flying geese. Unit should measure 5″ square.

WingedArrowLayout2

6. Lay out four units in the spinning direction shown below. Join into rows, join rows to complete Winged Arrow block.

WingedArrowLayout3

WingedArrowLayoutFinal

7. Square block to 9 1/2″.

 

Remember to share your pics with us via the Facebook page or the Flickr group! Or email us a pic at rowhousecreations(at)yahoo(dot)com. We’d love to see them!

Stay tuned, we have a new pattern release to announce this week!

Happy Sewing,

Doris & Trina

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Building Foundations Sampler QAL — Block 19

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This week’s quilt-along block, Block #19, is Double Star, attributed to Nancy Cabot:

double star

From Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns by Barbara Brackman, ©1993: Published by Nancy Cabot Syndicated column written by Loretta Leitner Rising for the Chicago Tribune in the 1930s. There were hundreds of Cabot patterns that were sold mail-order and grouped in booklets. The same patterns were also sold by the Spinning Wheel syndicate and the Progressive Farmer. The Cabot column began in 1932 and continued through the decade. Patterns were reprinted in the 1960s and ’70s by several small publishers but are currently out-of-print again as far as I know. Many of those attributed to Cabot by various indexers are probably NOT actually from that source.

This block was also published in the February 1945 issue of Farm Journal with the name of Home of Hartford.

 

CUTTING:

From background, (pale lavender in photo above) cut 4 — 2 1/4″ x 4 1/8″ rectangles, cut 1 — 4 3/4″ square (cut in half diagonally twice to make 4 A triangles).

From accent fabric #1 (rose color in photo above), cut 1 — 4 3/4″ square (cut in half diagonally twice to make 4 A triangles), cut 1 — 2 1/4″ square.

From accent fabric #2 (purple in photo above), cut 2 — 4 1/2″ squares (cut each in half diagonally to make 4 B triangles)

 

ASSEMBLY:

1. Join one background A triangle and one accent fabric #1 A triangle along short side. Press seam allowance toward print fabric. Repeat to make four triangle units:

TriangleUnit

2. Join an accent fabric #2 B triangle to the long side of each triangle unit as shown here:DoubleStar1

3. Press seam toward B triangle. Add a 2 1/4″ x 4 1/8″ background rectangle along the accent fabric #1 side. Press seam open.

4. To complete the block you will need to sew an inset seam. Lay your block out first, so you can see how it goes together:

DoubleStar35. The first seam you will sew is #1 in the diagram below. Line up, with right sides together, the large rectangle and the 2 1/4″ accent fabric #1 square. Stop sewing your seam 1/4″ from the end of the small square piece. Press seam toward accent fabric #1 square.

DoubleStar3a6. Add remaining rectangles in the order shown in above diagram. Press each seam toward larger rectangle.

DoubleStar4

7.  This is where you will sew your inset seam. Sew along seam line #4, stopping 1/4″ short of the end of the B triangle:

DoubleStar58. Press seam #4 toward B triangle. Align your two pieces together for seam #5. TIP: pin at point your seams need to match:

DoubleStar6

9. Set needle down at 1/4″ point you left off on seam #4, and sew to edge to complete block.

DoubleStar_Doris

10. Square block to 9 1/2″.

Here is Trina’s finished block:

DoubleStar_TrinaRemember to share your pics with us via the Facebook page or the Flickr group! Or email us a pic at rowhousecreations(at)yahoo(dot)com. We’d love to see them!

DoubleStar_Both

Happy Sewing,

Doris & Trina

Building Foundations Sampler QAL — Block 18

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This week’s quilt-along block, Block #18, is Crazy Loon, attributed to Nancy Cabot:

crazyloon

From Encyclopedia f Pieced Quilt Patterns by Barbara Brackman, ©1993: Published by Nancy Cabot Syndicated column written by Loretta Leitner Rising for the Chicago Tribune in the 1930s. There were hundreds of Cabot patterns that were sold mail-order and grouped in booklets. The same patterns were also sold by the Spinning Wheel syndicate and the Progressive Farmer. The Cabot column began in 1932 and continued through the decade. Patterns were reprinted in the 1960s and ’70s by several small publishers but are currently out-of-print again as far as I know. Many of those attributed to Cabot by various indexers are probably NOT actually from that source.

CrazyLoon1

CUTTING:

From background, (white in photo above) cut 2 — 3 5/8″ squares, 2 — 3 1/4″ squares (cut in half diagonally to make 4 B triangles), and 1 — 3 1/2″ square (cut in half diagonally in both directions to make 4 A triangles).

From accent fabric #1 (Lime/pink dot print in photo above), cut 4 — 2 1/8″ squares

From accent fabric #2 (Green bead print in photo above), cut 4 — 2 1/8″ x 3 5/8″ rectangles, and 4 — 2 1/8″ x 4″ rectangles.

TIP: Because this block is a little complicated, and set on point in a way, I recommend laying your pieces out like I did above so you can see how they will fit together before you start piecing.

 

ASSEMBLY:

1. Join one 3 5/8″ background square and one 2 1/8″ x 4″ accent fabric #2 rectangle. Press seam allowance toward print fabric. Repeat to make two background units:

CrazyLoon22. Join another 2 1/8″ x 4″ accent fabric #2 rectangle to the adjacent side of each background unit as shown below:

CrazyLoon43. Press seam open. Your background units will now look like this:

CrazyLoon54. Join one 2 1/8″ accent fabric #1 square to one 2 1/8″ x 3 5/8″ accent fabric #2 rectangle. Press seam open. repeat to make two:

CrazyLoon35. Join one 2 1/8″ accent fabric #1 square and two A triangles as shown below. Press seams toward triangles:

CrazyLoon66. Join one 2 1/8″ x 3 5/8″ accent fabric #2 rectangle to one side of the triangle unit you made in Step #5. Press seam toward rectangle. Repeat on second triangle unit:

CrazyLoon77. Join the strip you made in Step #4 to the adjacent side of the triangle unit:

CrazyLoon88. Press seam toward rectangle. Your triangle unit should now look like the photo below. Repeat on second triangle unit:

CrazyLoon9

9. Lay your block out like this to better visualize how to piece it together:

CrazyLoon1010. Join into pairs (as if you were making a simple 4-patch block), Join pairs together to complete your block (Don’t worry–We haven’t trimmed anything yet!):

CrazyLoon1111. Using a 9 1/2″ ruler (HIGHLY RECOMMENDED since that is the finished size of our block) line up the 4 3/4″ marks, both horizontally and vertically, with the center point of your block (where the two background rectangles meet). You should have a generous 1/4″ seam allowance left on all four sides where the accent fabric #1 squares and the large background squares meet the edges:

CrazyLoon1212. Once you are certain you have the ruler lined up correctly, trim on all four sides, like this:

CrazyLoon1313. Add a B background triangle to each corner of your block. Square up to 9 1/2″, if needed.

Here is my finished block, beside Trina’s finish block:

CrazyLoonBoth

Piecing this block threw me at first (I didn’t have directions!) but if you follow step-by-step the instructions given, I promise it will work and it isn’t as complicated as it look.

I sort of want to make an entire quilt using this block!

How are you doing with your own Quilt-a-Long blocks? Hopefully our unintended break gave you time to get all caught up! Remember to share your pics with us via the Facebook page or the Flickr group! Or email us a pic at rowhousecreations(at)yahoo(dot)com. We’d love to see them!

Happy Sewing,

Doris & Trina

Building Foundations Sampler QAL — Block 14

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This week’s quilt-along block, Block #14, is Prairie Flower:

prairie flower

According to Jinny Beyer’s book, Prairie Flower was published by Jane Alan, Illinois State Register, April 2, 1933. However, Barbara Brackman attributes the block to Nancy Cabot: from a syndicated column written by Loretta Leitner Rising for the Chicago Tribune in the 1930s. There were hundreds of Cabot patterns that were sold mail-order and grouped in booklets. The same patterns were also sold by the Spinning Wheel syndicate and the Progressive Farmer. The Cabot column began in 1932 and continued through the decade. Patterns were reprinted in the 1960s and ’70s by several small publishers but are currently out-of-print again as far as I know. Many of those attributed to Cabot by various indexers are probably NOT actually from that source.

We both LOVE this block.

 

CUTTING:

From background (light green inblock diagram) 1 — 3 1/2″ square (for center; I used a Kaffe Fasset floral for my center), 16 — 2 1/2″ squares

From accent fabric #1 (Grey in block diagram)  4 — 3 1/2″ squares

From accent fabric #2 (Teal green in block diagram)  4 — 3 1/2″ squares

 

ASSEMBLY:

1. On the wrong side of each 2 1/2″ background square, draw a line diagonally from one corner to the opposite corner.

Block11_1

2. Place a background square atop one of your 3 1/2″ Accent Fabric #2 squares, right sides together (RST).

Block11_2

3. Stitch on the diagonal line you drew in Step 1. Trim the excess from the corner, press seam open.

4. Repeat Steps 2 & 3 on opposite corner to finish the Corner Unit. Make 4 Corner Units.

Block11_3

5. Place a background square atop one of your 3 1/2″ Accent Fabric #1 squares, right sides together (RST).

6. Stitch on the diagonal line you drew in Step 1. Trim the excess from the corner, press seam open.

7. Repeat Steps 5 & 6 on adjacent corner to finish the Alternate Units . Make 4 Alternate Units.

8. Lay out one Center Square (keep in mind I used a print, Trina’s is of the background solid fabric), four Corner Units, and four Alternate Units as shown:

Prairie Flower Dissected.jpg

9. Join into rows, join rows to make Prairie Flower Block:

PrairieFlowerBlock_Doris.jpg.jpg

Here’s Trina’s block:

Prairie_Flower_Trina.jpg

Notice, she got an entirely different look by using the striped fabric she chose, it almost looks as if the Alternate Units have pink triangles pieced onto the ends. Always try to think of how your fabrics can work for you to get different looks in your blocks:

Prairie_Flower_TrinaDetail.jpg

And here are our finished blocks, side-by-side:

Prairie_Flower_Both.jpg

Remember to share your pics with us via the Facebook page or the Flickr group!

Happy Sewing,

Doris & Trina

Building Foundations Sampler QAL – Block 11

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January 15th already; Spring will be here before we know it (Thank goodness!) Trina finished quilting our prototype for Pattern #6 last week (Coming Early 2014) and it is stunning! I’m going to be finishing the binding tonight. I may show you some sneak peeks here next week.

But today it’s time for your next quilt-along block:

Spool Block nancy Cabot Building Foundations Quilt Along

Block #11, the Spool Block, is very similar to the currently popular x & + block. The middle bar is the only difference.  The original design is by Nancy Cabot, first published in the Chicago Tribune on April 1, 1938. It’s reappearance at a recent Japanese Quilt Festival in this quilt by Setsuko Inagawa brought about the contemporary interest in it.

CUTTING:

From background, cut 8 – 2 5/8″ squares.

From accent fabric #1 (X-piece, dark green in my block above) cut 4 – 4 1/4″ squares.

From accent fabric #2, cut 5 – 2 1/4″ squares.

From accent fabric #3, cut 4 – 2 1/4″ squares.

ASSEMBLY:

Block11_1

1. On the wrong side of each 2 5/8″ background square, draw a line diagonally from one corner to the opposite corner. 

2. Place a background square atop one of your 4 1/4″ squares, right sides together (RST).

Block11_2

3. Stitch on the diagonal line you drew in Step 1. Trim the excess from the corner, press seam open.

4. Repeat Steps 2 & 3 on opposite corner to finish the corner unit. Make 4 corner units.

Block11_3

5. Lay out 4 Corner Units and 9 – 2 1/4″ squares as shown below. NOTE: Take care to sew a scant 1/4″ seam allowance. If your seam allowance is too large or inconsistent, your block will not come out to 9.5″ unfinished.

Block11_4

6. Join into rows, join rows to complete Spool Block.

Block11_5

And here are out finished blocks again, side-by-side:

Nancy Cabot Spool Block x & + block QAL

Notice Trina (her block is on the left) used her background fabric as her accent fabric #3, too; which yields a slightly different, cleaner look. It makes her other two fabrics really pop!

Remember to share your pics with us via the Facebook page or the Flickr group!

Happy Sewing,

Doris & Trina

Building Foundations Sampler QAL – Block 10

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HAPPY NEW YEAR!  Just finished putting away all of the Christmas decorations and dusting and vacuuming today. It’s nice to have the house so clean, but it does look bare without the glitz and shine of Christmas decorations! Also managed to sneak in enough sewing time to sew up Block 10 (I swear I’ll work ahead one of these days…) 😉

Block #10, the Economy Patch, by Ladies Art Company, 1897. The Ladies Art Company, established in 1889 in St. Louis, MO, offered quilt patterns for sale through their catalogs until the 1930s. Interestingly enough, they also sold finished blocks!

CUTTING:

For center square, cut 1 – 5″ square (Trina’s background piece – in Kona Pond)

Accent fabric 1, cut 1 – 5 3/4″ square; cut in half diagonally in both directions to make 4 quarter-square triangles (QSTs).

Accent fabric 2, cut 2 – 5 3/8″ squares; cut in half diagonally to make 4 half-square triangles (HSTs). (Doris’s background pieces – in Cotton Couture White)

Block 10 Foundations Sampler QAL Economy Patch Quilt Block

ASSEMBLY:

1. Lay out center square, QSTs and HSTs as shown:

Economy Patch Quilt Block Step 1

2. Join a QST to opposite sides of center square, press. Trim points even with center square:

Economy Patch Quilt Block Step 2

3. Join remaining two QSTs to center unit, press:

Block 10 Foundations Sampler QAL Economy Patch Quilt Block

4. Repeat step 2 & 3 with HSTs. Press, square up to 9.5″.

Our finished blocks, once again:

Block 10 Foundations QAL Economy Patch Quilt Block

Remember to share your pics with us via the Facebook page or the Flickr group!

Wishing you a Wonderful 2014,

Doris & Trina

Building Foundations Sampler QAL – Block 6

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It’s November already–the air has gotten cooler and the days shorter. We just had warm comfort food; meatloaf, baked potatoes and pumpkin pie… and now we’re ready for a nap! But first, Block #6, the Cross Block:

cross quilt block row house creations building foundations sampler

Cross Block Diagram

Block 6 Cross Block, Farm and Home, Feb 15, 1915

From Jinny Beyer’s Book: “Eight pieces of the dark and 17 of the light goods, compose this block, and when a number of them are put together a very pretty effect of five-square and eight-square crosses is brought out. The order of the colors may be reversed. These blocks should be sewn together without strips of cloth between to produce the intended design.” Farm and Home, Feb 15, 1915

CUTTING:

Background fabric, cut 17 – 2 5/16″ squares.

Accent fabric, cut 8 – 2 5/16″ squares.

ASSEMBLY:

1. Lay out background and accent squares as shown in Cross Block Diagram.

2. Join into rows, join rows to complete block.

TIP: Press seam allowances one direction in rows 1, 3 and 5, and the opposite direction in rows 2 and 4. This will make your seams nest together snugly for better matching corners.

Building Foundations QAL Block 6 Cross Quilt Block

We hope your blocks are coming along, and you like how they look; remember to share your pics with us via the Facebook page or the Flickr group!

Happy quilting,

Trina & Doris