Hidden Gems

The new issue of Fons & Porter’s Scrap Quilts (Summer 2015) includes a pattern by Row House Creations. It’s a baby quilt that was first made for Doris’s granddaughter for her 1st birthday.

17093_10205811642123170_7308003853359679834_nHere’s is our not-so-great flat shot…

GemmaQuilt_Fons&Porter

And Gemma’s original quilt, using just two colors and the background made scrappy:

finalfullshotgemmaquilt

And here’s a great tip for the backing of a baby quilt: Fuse and machine applique a large monogram (this “G” is about 14″ tall) to the backing prior to quilting. Depending on the color fabric you use, you can also sign the monogram and have it do double-duty as your quilt label.

finalgemmaquiltbackdetailThere are some other wonderful quilts in this issue, including one by our friend, Leila–go grab a copy!

Happy Quilting!

Trina & Doris

NEW PATTERN Pinafore is Here!!!

Another pattern that has been a long time in the making. But 2014 brought shock and heartache, and this beautiful quilt that was completed in December 2013, was tabled for a long time. Well the wait is over, we have it ready! Available in PRINTED or PDF versions in our Etsy Shop, on Craftsy, Patternspot, and from your LQS (Shop owners: you can order wholesale directly from us or through United Notions, Checker Distributors, Petersen-Arne, and Quilt Craft Distributors in Canada). Pinafore_FrontCover copy The block is 18.5″ — and the pattern is written for Twin (12 blocks), Queen (16 blocks) and King (25 blocks) sizes. We tested A LOT of block sizes before settling on the 18.5″ size… PinaforeTestBlocks Pinafore Block for BlogThe secondary pattern created by the corner triangles and the sashing cornerstones can change the look of the quilt completely based on fabric placement… Pinafore Close-Up Pinafore Style Shot 1Here is the Queen size layout, just 16 blocks: FlatShot_for Blog PinaforeEven a novice quilter could make this quilt; it is just pinwheels, half-square triangles and simple sashing and borders. We hope you love it as much as we do! Pinafore Style Shot 2WE CANNOT WAIT TO SEE YOUR PINAFORE QUILT!

Happy Quilting,

Trina & Doris

Building Foundations Sampler QAL – Block 20

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This week’s quilt-along block, Block #20, is Winged Arrow, from a syndicated mail-order column written by Florence LaGanke Harris; printed in many periodicals in the late 1920s – 1940s.

Untitled

CUTTING:

From background, (pale blue and green in photo above) cut 8 — 3 5/8″ squares (cut in half diagonally to make 16 A triangles).

From accent fabric #1 (orange in photo above) cut 1 — 5 3/4″ square (cut in half diagonally twice to make 4 B triangles).

From accent fabric #2 (red-orange in photo above) cut 1 — 5 3/4″ square (cut in half diagonally twice to make 4 B triangles).

 

ASSEMBLY:

1. Join one background A triangle and one accent fabric #1 B triangle as shown below. Press seam allowance toward print fabric. Make four.

WingedArrowGeese1

2. Join a second background A triangle to the opposite side to complete flying geese units:

WingedArrowGeese2

3. Trim each flying geese unit to 3″ x 5″:WingedArrowGeese3

4. Repeat steps 1-3 using accent fabric #2 B triangles.

5. Join an accent fabric #1 flying geese to the bottom edge of an accent fabric #2 flying geese. Unit should measure 5″ square.

WingedArrowLayout2

6. Lay out four units in the spinning direction shown below. Join into rows, join rows to complete Winged Arrow block.

WingedArrowLayout3

WingedArrowLayoutFinal

7. Square block to 9 1/2″.

 

Remember to share your pics with us via the Facebook page or the Flickr group! Or email us a pic at rowhousecreations(at)yahoo(dot)com. We’d love to see them!

Stay tuned, we have a new pattern release to announce this week!

Happy Sewing,

Doris & Trina

Building Foundations Sampler QAL — Block 19

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This week’s quilt-along block, Block #19, is Double Star, attributed to Nancy Cabot:

double star

From Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns by Barbara Brackman, ©1993: Published by Nancy Cabot Syndicated column written by Loretta Leitner Rising for the Chicago Tribune in the 1930s. There were hundreds of Cabot patterns that were sold mail-order and grouped in booklets. The same patterns were also sold by the Spinning Wheel syndicate and the Progressive Farmer. The Cabot column began in 1932 and continued through the decade. Patterns were reprinted in the 1960s and ’70s by several small publishers but are currently out-of-print again as far as I know. Many of those attributed to Cabot by various indexers are probably NOT actually from that source.

This block was also published in the February 1945 issue of Farm Journal with the name of Home of Hartford.

 

CUTTING:

From background, (pale lavender in photo above) cut 4 — 2 1/4″ x 4 1/8″ rectangles, cut 1 — 4 3/4″ square (cut in half diagonally twice to make 4 A triangles).

From accent fabric #1 (rose color in photo above), cut 1 — 4 3/4″ square (cut in half diagonally twice to make 4 A triangles), cut 1 — 2 1/4″ square.

From accent fabric #2 (purple in photo above), cut 2 — 4 1/2″ squares (cut each in half diagonally to make 4 B triangles)

 

ASSEMBLY:

1. Join one background A triangle and one accent fabric #1 A triangle along short side. Press seam allowance toward print fabric. Repeat to make four triangle units:

TriangleUnit

2. Join an accent fabric #2 B triangle to the long side of each triangle unit as shown here:DoubleStar1

3. Press seam toward B triangle. Add a 2 1/4″ x 4 1/8″ background rectangle along the accent fabric #1 side. Press seam open.

4. To complete the block you will need to sew an inset seam. Lay your block out first, so you can see how it goes together:

DoubleStar35. The first seam you will sew is #1 in the diagram below. Line up, with right sides together, the large rectangle and the 2 1/4″ accent fabric #1 square. Stop sewing your seam 1/4″ from the end of the small square piece. Press seam toward accent fabric #1 square.

DoubleStar3a6. Add remaining rectangles in the order shown in above diagram. Press each seam toward larger rectangle.

DoubleStar4

7.  This is where you will sew your inset seam. Sew along seam line #4, stopping 1/4″ short of the end of the B triangle:

DoubleStar58. Press seam #4 toward B triangle. Align your two pieces together for seam #5. TIP: pin at point your seams need to match:

DoubleStar6

9. Set needle down at 1/4″ point you left off on seam #4, and sew to edge to complete block.

DoubleStar_Doris

10. Square block to 9 1/2″.

Here is Trina’s finished block:

DoubleStar_TrinaRemember to share your pics with us via the Facebook page or the Flickr group! Or email us a pic at rowhousecreations(at)yahoo(dot)com. We’d love to see them!

DoubleStar_Both

Happy Sewing,

Doris & Trina

Upcoming Workshop for Quilters

If you are near Northern Iowa, you might want to consider signing up for NIACC’s Quilting Treasures Workshop for Quilters on Saturday, September 27, 2014.

Yours truly will be the Keynote speakers…

Quilting Postcard 2014 copyTo register, call or email the contact information on the image above,

Happy Quilting, 

Trina & Doris

Building Foundations Sampler QAL — Block 18

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This week’s quilt-along block, Block #18, is Crazy Loon, attributed to Nancy Cabot:

crazyloon

From Encyclopedia f Pieced Quilt Patterns by Barbara Brackman, ©1993: Published by Nancy Cabot Syndicated column written by Loretta Leitner Rising for the Chicago Tribune in the 1930s. There were hundreds of Cabot patterns that were sold mail-order and grouped in booklets. The same patterns were also sold by the Spinning Wheel syndicate and the Progressive Farmer. The Cabot column began in 1932 and continued through the decade. Patterns were reprinted in the 1960s and ’70s by several small publishers but are currently out-of-print again as far as I know. Many of those attributed to Cabot by various indexers are probably NOT actually from that source.

CrazyLoon1

CUTTING:

From background, (white in photo above) cut 2 — 3 5/8″ squares, 2 — 3 1/4″ squares (cut in half diagonally to make 4 B triangles), and 1 — 3 1/2″ square (cut in half diagonally in both directions to make 4 A triangles).

From accent fabric #1 (Lime/pink dot print in photo above), cut 4 — 2 1/8″ squares

From accent fabric #2 (Green bead print in photo above), cut 4 — 2 1/8″ x 3 5/8″ rectangles, and 4 — 2 1/8″ x 4″ rectangles.

TIP: Because this block is a little complicated, and set on point in a way, I recommend laying your pieces out like I did above so you can see how they will fit together before you start piecing.

 

ASSEMBLY:

1. Join one 3 5/8″ background square and one 2 1/8″ x 4″ accent fabric #2 rectangle. Press seam allowance toward print fabric. Repeat to make two background units:

CrazyLoon22. Join another 2 1/8″ x 4″ accent fabric #2 rectangle to the adjacent side of each background unit as shown below:

CrazyLoon43. Press seam open. Your background units will now look like this:

CrazyLoon54. Join one 2 1/8″ accent fabric #1 square to one 2 1/8″ x 3 5/8″ accent fabric #2 rectangle. Press seam open. repeat to make two:

CrazyLoon35. Join one 2 1/8″ accent fabric #1 square and two A triangles as shown below. Press seams toward triangles:

CrazyLoon66. Join one 2 1/8″ x 3 5/8″ accent fabric #2 rectangle to one side of the triangle unit you made in Step #5. Press seam toward rectangle. Repeat on second triangle unit:

CrazyLoon77. Join the strip you made in Step #4 to the adjacent side of the triangle unit:

CrazyLoon88. Press seam toward rectangle. Your triangle unit should now look like the photo below. Repeat on second triangle unit:

CrazyLoon9

9. Lay your block out like this to better visualize how to piece it together:

CrazyLoon1010. Join into pairs (as if you were making a simple 4-patch block), Join pairs together to complete your block (Don’t worry–We haven’t trimmed anything yet!):

CrazyLoon1111. Using a 9 1/2″ ruler (HIGHLY RECOMMENDED since that is the finished size of our block) line up the 4 3/4″ marks, both horizontally and vertically, with the center point of your block (where the two background rectangles meet). You should have a generous 1/4″ seam allowance left on all four sides where the accent fabric #1 squares and the large background squares meet the edges:

CrazyLoon1212. Once you are certain you have the ruler lined up correctly, trim on all four sides, like this:

CrazyLoon1313. Add a B background triangle to each corner of your block. Square up to 9 1/2″, if needed.

Here is my finished block, beside Trina’s finish block:

CrazyLoonBoth

Piecing this block threw me at first (I didn’t have directions!) but if you follow step-by-step the instructions given, I promise it will work and it isn’t as complicated as it look.

I sort of want to make an entire quilt using this block!

How are you doing with your own Quilt-a-Long blocks? Hopefully our unintended break gave you time to get all caught up! Remember to share your pics with us via the Facebook page or the Flickr group! Or email us a pic at rowhousecreations(at)yahoo(dot)com. We’d love to see them!

Happy Sewing,

Doris & Trina

Building Foundations Sampler QAL — Block 17

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First things first, I want to thank you all for your patience this Spring and Summer as we work to get back into a routine. We have the next three blocks made and ready for posting–but life’s roller coaster hasn’t slowed to a stop, yet. And routine isn’t in either of our vocabularies right now. Hang in there with us, we promise not to abandon you with your blocks and no pattern to finish them!

Our newest quilt-along block, Block #17, is Union Square, attributed to Nancy Cabot:

union square quilt block

There were hundreds of Cabot patterns that were sold mail-order and grouped in booklets. The same patterns were also published in a syndicated column, written by Loretta Leitner Rising (Chicago Tribune), which began in 1932 and continued through the 1930s. The patterns were reprinted in the 1960s and ’70s by several small publishers but are currently out-of-print again.

Block17_pieces

CUTTING:

From background, (white in block below) cut 4 — 2 3/8″ squares (cut in half diagonally), and 4 — 2 5/8″ squares.

From accent fabric #1 (red floral in block below), cut 4 — 2 5/8″ squares

From accent fabric #2 (grey in block diagram above), cut 4 — 3 3/4″ squares.

 

ASSEMBLY:

1. Join one background and two accent fabric #1 squares into a row. Make two rows like this. Join two background squares and one accent fabric #1 square into a row. Join three rows to make the 9-patch center for the block.

Block17_9Patch

 

2. Add a white triangle to adjacent sides of the large accent fabric #2 squares as shown below (note the triangle/seam has been pressed open here). To line up for sewing the seam, lay white/background triangle atop the accent fabric #2 square aligning right angle corners. Repeat in opposite corner of the accent fabric #2 square. Flip triangles and press seams:

Block17_CornerA

 

3. Line your ruler up with the long side of your white/background triangles, using the lines on your ruler to make sure the unsewn sides of your large square (accent fabric #2) form a right angle that extends along white/background triangles:

Block17_CornerTrim

 

4. Trim the fourth corner of the large square that extends beyond the white/background triangles (see photo above) to complete your Corner Unit. Repeat on all four Corner Units.

5. Add a Corner Unit to each side of your center 9-patch. Press seams toward Corner.

Block17_Doris

6. Square to 9 1/2″, if needed (unfinished).

And here are our finished blocks, side-by-side:

Block17_Both

Remember to share your pics with us via the Facebook page or the Flickr group!

Happy Sewing,

Doris & Trina